Archive for May, 2010

Island Life

Monday, May 3rd, 2010

Life on the island is running it’s course, people come and go, the beach is white and the jungle is green, the sea is dark blue and sky is a lighter blue, the sun rises and the sun sets, the moon and stars spin their course above all of us. The past few days I’ve been in the good company of Mike, Briony, Jim, Sally and Terry. Mike has moved to the big island to work for Arwana, the others have continued their respective journeys, that will take them to Dubai, Indonesia, Kuala Lumpur, Thailand and other places near and far.

Today I went to Arwana because they’ve been servicing and storing our scuba tanks over the monsoon, and I got to see Mikey in the bargain. When I got back, Ramli, father of Sunlight’s founder and owner, Sunny, was here. We had lunch together, I got the keys, we sorted out the building of the new deck and discussed the arrival of our boat, scuba equipment and compressors. One of the compressors still needs servicing, and the boat needs to have the second of it’s twin outboard engines mounted, but now things are moving!

img_0170I sketched an outline for the new deck with the necessities we need to have on it, like basins for equipment washing, water supply and shower, tank racks, and drying racks for BCDs, wetsuits, fins, masks and snorkels. Carleed, the manager and co-owner of Moonlight will make a sketch of his vision, then we’ll review them and make the decision. He’s still vying for a solid concrete structure, while I’m more inclined to have a concrete base and wooden deck, for a more esthetic look. 🙂 The solid concrete could work, as long as sufficient drainage is added, to counteract underwash and subsequent erosion, but it will break with the general look of the existing building mass. It might also be more susceptible to break under heavy wave action during monsoon, but Carleed doesn’t seem to think this will be a problem, and I guess he knows the effect of monsoon waves on the beach. At least we seem to agree that it should have as few levels as possible, to avoid people tripping on steps with their dive gear on and such.